Para Que Crezcan Las Raices / For the Roots to Grow

Para Que Crezcan Las Raices / For the Roots to Grow

Synopsis:

This film tells the story of the personal struggles of a first generation college student, Brenda Ocampo. The daughter of immigrants from the Mexican states of Morelos and Oaxaca, Brenda first enjoys the tight-knit Latinx community her parents fostered in Eugene, Oregon. When she takes the chance to attend a High School outside of her neighborhood in hopes of attaining a better education, Brenda finds herself feeling isolated and out of place in the majority-white, and more academically rigorous school. As a result, Brenda is admitted into a mental health treatment facility before returning to school. Through the encouragement of a PE teacher, Brenda joins a school program designed to help under-represented students make connections, achieve their academic goals, and attend college.

 

Producer’s Bio:

Sofia Vicente-Vidal is a third-year graduate student in the UO’s department of Anthropology. The Latino Roots course has given me the valuable skill of documentary filmmaking which I plan to continue playing with and exploring other stories to tell through movies. This was an especially meaningful project as I can personally relate to many of the struggles Brenda describes in her own journey as an outsider in institutions of public and higher education. I hope middle school and high school students who view this film and identify with Brenda will start to imagine their own path towards belonging and achieving their academic, creative, and professional goals.

 

Santa Ana Made: Sergio B. Sanchez

Santa Ana Made: Sergio B. Sanchez

Synopsis:

Growing up in Santa Ana, California, nearly two hours away from the Mexican Border, artist Sergio B. Sanchez was exposed to both a life rich in culture, and a life of risky and dangerous activity. As someone who experienced a possible parent deportation and a continuous life in poverty, Sergio began to act up and immerse himself in the easy money-making life. By the time he was in middle school, Sergio was beginning to fall down the wrong path. But through the support of his family, teachers, mentors, and his love for art, Sergio was able to change his ways and strive for better choices. Sergio has overcome adversities and now hopes to inspire others through his artistic talents and experiences.

 

Producer’s Bio:

Noeli Martinez-Gabriel is an undergraduate student at the University of Oregon. She is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism at the School of Journalism and Communications with a minor in Spanish. Her focus is in print and multimedia reporting. Through this course, she has been able to apply her journalistic skills and her passion for storytelling. In the span of 20 weeks, Noeli challenged herself to make documentary film which she had never done before. Her overall goal, was to truthfully share Sergio’s life story.

 

Pero eso es Vida

Pero eso es Vida

Synopsis:

The young adulthood of Mexican immigrant Luis Alberto Navez Dircio: Luis was brought to the United States with his mother at the age of 8, pursuing a better life for their family. This film explores the environments Luis grew up in, and the various challenges these environmnents created, as well as how he plans to give back to the community that allowed him to find success.

Finding Success: An Interview with Carol Rodgers

Finding Success: An Interview with Carol Rodgers

Synopsis:

Carol Rodgers is the first generation daughter of Costa Rican immigrants Juan and Sally Bonilla, who entered the U.S. in the early 1960s. Carol’s niece, Miranda Harding, facilitates a discussion of Carol’s life, who spent her childhood in La Puente, California. The Bonillas moved to Costa Rica for a year when Carol was young before she reentered and finished school in La Puente. While on summer vacation in Oregon, Juan finds a farm house that he loves, causing the Bonillas to relocate to Hillsboro. Carol quickly found love and has spent 30 years raising her family in Hillsboro while working as a judge’s assistant for Washington County.

 

Producer’s Bio:

I am Miranda Harding and I am completing an undergraduate degree in Anthropology with a double concentration in cultural anthropology and archaeology and a minor in History. Latino Roots I and II gave me invaluable insight into the process of conducting research with living people towards the goal of forming a coherent narrative.

 

Family and Migration: Chey’s Experience

Family and Migration: Chey’s Experience

Synopsis:

This film is about Eliezer Chey Gonzalez. He was raised in Huandacarao, Michoacán, Mexico, and he migrated to Eugene when he was 14 and a half. He had to attend North Eugene High School after going to the same school for 11 years. He graduated high school and was accepted at the University of Oregon where he earned a bachelor degree in sociology with a minor in business. He is married with two children and works for the Department of Human Services in the child welfare department. This story is important, because it shows that Mexican migrants are productive, responsible and are family-oriented people and not all criminals like the Trump administration wants everyone to believe.

 

Producer’s Bio:

My name is Mark Howard. I am a senior at the University of Oregon where I’m a journalism major and an anthropology minor. Most of my classes are taken at UO’s School of Journalism and Communication (SOJC). This course helped me learn about the history of Mexican migration in the US, and it showed me the complex workings of transborder communities.  It also taught me the fundamentals of documentary theory, filmmaking and interviewing. All of these skills will be useful to my future as a journalist and videographer.

 

Teresa Alonso Leon: Oregon’s Latina Legislator/ Teresa Alonso León: Legisladora Latina de Oregón

Teresa Alonso Leon: Oregon’s Latina Legislator/ Teresa Alonso León: Legisladora Latina de Oregón

Synopsis:

The story of Oregon’s first immigrant Latina legislator, Teresa Alonso Leon, the film follows her journey to the Oregon capitol from San Jeronimo, Michoacán, México. As a child of migrant farmers, Teresa worked in the fields alongside her parents and gained leadership skills helping care for her younger siblings. Encouraged by her teachers, Teresa became the first in her family to graduate college and pursued a career developing education opportunities for young people of underrepresented and low income communities. As the Representative for District 22, one of the most diverse districts and home to the largest Latino community in the state, Teresa works to pass policies that support education, health, affordable housing, and social justice.

 

Producer’s Bio:

Kisa Clark is a second-year PhD student in Media Studies. As a researcher interested in the role of culture in communicative processes, this course helped develop my understanding of the important historical, racial, and political factors that shape a place and the communities within it. Utilizing documentary film as an effective research tool to better understand and add to the underdeveloped narrative of Oregon’s Latino history has been a uniquely valuable and thought-provoking experience.

 

New Beginnings in Oregon

New Beginnings in Oregon

Synopsis:

This documentary tells the story of Rommel Antonio Sobalvarro Sr., a Nicaraguan man in his -mid 40’s who immigrated to California when he was four months old with his family. He grew up and spent most of his early adult life in Lancaster, California and was a member of a local Crip street gang for many years until he became a father and wanted to lead a better life for his family. In Oregon, he found value in the jobs he held and has been in a management position for nearly two decades.

 

Producer’s Bio:

I am a graduating senior at the University of Oregon and am majoring in Anthropology with concentrations in both Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology and have a minor in Earth Sciences: Geology. What began as an interest in archaeology grew into a passion for learning more about living cultures and peoples as well. I enrolled in the Latino Roots courses after taking a class on Immigration and Farmworkers, which was also taught by Dr. Lynn Stephen, in the Fall of 2019. These classes helped give me an understanding of the historical processes that led to Latino/a immigration and settlement in Oregon and gave me the opportunity to add to the scholarship of Latino/a people in Oregon through the recorded oral history interview, family images procured, and the documentary film I produced. Documentary films are a favorite genre of mine; and the interviewing and media editing skills I learned in this course, even during a pandemic, will be useful as I begin to navigate my post-college career.

 

Una Jaula de Oro

Una Jaula de Oro

Synopsis:

This documentary is about a Mexican-immigrant single mother, Esperanza Mora, who
has struggled with racial descrimination and the difficulties of raising her daughter on her own;
this documentary also shows Karina Mora, her daughters’ experience growing up with a single
mother. Esperanza shares her experience living in Michoacan Mexico within the 14 years she
lived there, and her experience in the United States. This includes her life as an immigrant
agricultural worker and the difficulties she has had to overcome. Which is significant due to the
fact that it can raise awareness for many people who have experienced similar situations and can show how many people deal with certain experiences as immigrants, or single parents, or even both.

 

Producer’s Bio:

I am Karina Mora, 21-years-old currently enrolled at University of Oregon as a Junior. I am a first generation in my family to have the opportunity to attend a higher education (college) and taking this class as a Latina, really helped my growth in my Latino roots. I was able to have two amazing professors, Dr. Stephen and Dr. Martinez, who are passionate about this class, which has been an amazing experience for the past two terms. I enjoy learning about my roots and where I come from, I also love watching documentaries of people out there and their experience as a Latino! Every story is different, is diverse but with many similarities that can be related to which I see it as an opportunity to learn about others and their own experience as a Latino.

 

Upward Migration

Upward Migration

Synopsis:

This short movie documents the life and journey of Vannia Glasinovic from her childhood in Bolivia to her work as an immigration attorney in Eugene, Oregon. It starts by discussing her current life during the Coronavirus pandemic, before diving into her story. This film highlights her childhood in Bolivia and the changes she has seen there since she moved to the United States. It also covers her switch from environmental law to immigraiton law as well as her battles against discrimination both in her practice and her life as a whole. Vannia discusses the recent changes in immigration law, as well as what she thinks the future holds.

 

Producer’s Bio:

My name is Jackson McCormick and I am a junior at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communications majoring in public relations with a minor in anthropology. The Latino Roots course has sparked a passion for storytelling and videography, and I am excited to build off of what I have learned from this course. 

I want to give my utmost appreciation to Professor Martinez and Professor Stephen for the opportunity to be a part of this course, and Vannia Glasinovic for working with me to make this movie during these very uncertain times.